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Clinical Dermatology

Cutaneous leishmaniasis and its clinical spectrum.
An overview from the Old World

Review, 12 - 21
doi: 10.11138/cderm/2017.5.1.012
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Abstract
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Cutaneous leishmaniasis is still considered by the World Health Organization (WHO) an uncontrolled disease, affecting nearly 100 countries in the Old
World (Europe, middle East, Asia, Africa) and in the New World (Central and South America).
Depending on the species of Leishmania, host genetics, and immune factors, a spectrum of different clinical forms of the disease may develop, conventionally known as localized cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL), mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL), anergic diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (ADCL) and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL).
The range of clinical and immunological manifestations of leishmaniasis has been the subject of many studies in order to understand the host immune mechanisms that are playing a crucial role in the pathogenesis of this disease.
The individual features are relevant in order to choose effective therapeutic interventions and to establish a prognosis. Therefore, the different forms of this disease should be kept in mind in endemic countries, as well as in immigrant populations and travellers.
This review highlights the immunological-clinical correlation in the spectrum, with special reference to the disease in the Old World.

Vol. 5 (No. 1) 2017 January - March

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  1. Cutaneous leishmaniasis and its clinical spectrum.
    An overview from the Old World

    Dassoni F.
    doi: 10.11138/cderm/2017.5.1.012
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